Job Opportunities

DoVA has one full time position available.

Lecturer of Visual Art

The College (Humanities Collegiate Division) at the University of Chicago is accepting applications for a one-year (renewable) full-time Lecturer of Visual Art, to teach at least six classes per year (no less than two courses per academic quarter). A minimum of three of the courses should be sections of "Visual Language: On Images and/or Visual Language: On Objects." The description for these two courses can be found at http://dova.uchicago.edu/job-opportunities. The remaining classes will be a combination of seminars for art majors and minors and/or courses in other media (sculpture, drawing, painting, photography). Other responsibilities include participation in critiques of undergraduate and graduate students in a variety of media and advising up to two undergraduate art majors per year.

An MFA, or five years of equivalent professional experience is necessary, as are a deep commitment to one's own artwork and an active exhibition record. Experience teaching at the college level is required. We welcome applicants who are able to teach classes in a variety of media (sculpture, drawing, painting, photography); and seeks applicants whose intellectual and creative interests will lead to building collaborative conversation within the context of the intense and rigorous intellectual culture of the University. The successful candidate will demonstrate the interest and ability to communicate both within their specific disciplinary area as well as across a range of media.


Applications for this position must be submitted online via the University of Chicago Academic Career Opportunities Website: https://academiccareers.uchicago.edu, select requisition # 03534 and upload a cover letter that includes a clear and compelling articulation of how the applicant's work engages its form; a current curriculum vitae containing the applicant's name, phone, email, and mailing address; a statement addressing the applicant's approach to teaching; and contact information for three references.

Applicants must ALSO submit an image portfolio on Slide Room at the following link: https://uchicago.slideroom.com/#/login/program/39596/sKC7uj48fA

Applications will not be considered until all materials have been received.

This position is contingent upon final budgetary approval.

Review of applications will begin on November 20, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Disabled/Veterans Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law. For additional information please see the University's Notice of Nondiscrimination at http://www.uchicago.edu/about/non_discrimination_statement/. Job seekers in need of a reasonable accommodation to complete the application process should call 773-702-0287 or email ACOppAdministrator@uchicago.edu with their request.

 

Course descriptions for Lecturer of Visual Art position

Visual Language: On Images

Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, illusion, analogy, metaphor, time and memory, nature and culture, abstraction, the role of the author, and universal systems can be illuminated through these primary investigations. Visits to museums and other fieldwork required, as is participation in studio exercises and group critiques.

Visual Language: On Objects. 100 Units.

Through studio work and critical discussions on 3D form, this course is intended to reveal the conventions of sculpture while investigating its modes of production. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, platonic form, analogy, metaphor, verisimilitude, abstraction, nature and culture, and the body politic can be illuminated through these primary investigations. Visits to museums and other fieldwork required, as is participation in studio exercises and group critiques.